Te Kura Horticulture
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Horticulture 1000
HT1081 - Landscaping - Landscaping larger areas
Hard landscaping Design tools
6

Landscaping larger areas

Children’s play areas

Any play equipment needs to be safe and well-maintained. Use soft surfaces such as rubber matting and bark around equipment.

The equipment needs to cater for a range of ages. Don’t use poisonous or dangerous plants near the area.

Playing fields

Choose plants that withstand heavy wear, and dry and wet weather conditions. You may need to install drainage.

The turf (grass) needs to be carefully maintained. The grass must be regularly cut, fertilised, irrigated if possible, weeded and any worn patches renewed.

Some playing fields need more attention than others. Bowling greens need an even, short-clipped surface, whereas a rugby field has longer grass and isn’t as smooth.

School grounds

This play area in a primary school is designed to be both safe and physically challenging for the students who use it. It has been designed with a particular age group in mind. It has been constructed above safety matting, and the pohutukawa tree provides some summer shade.
This play area in a primary school is designed to be both safe and physically challenging for its students. It has been designed with a particular age group in mind. It has been constructed above safety matting, and the pohutukawa tree provides some summer shade.

These are often landscaped. They usually include play equipment, playing fields and covered seating areas to eat lunch. The plants used are hard-wearing and non-poisonous in school grounds. Gardens can include edible vegetables, flowers and small fruit.

Primary school sites need to be secure to prevent young children wandering off the site onto roads.

Public parks and botanical gardens

A knot garden in a botanical garden, demonstrating a particular garden style.
A knot garden in a botanical garden, demonstrating a particular garden style.

Parks provide a place of retreat in the middle of a town or city.

They provide a green space away from the bustle of people and the noise of traffic.

Botanic gardens are larger parks and provide areas for displaying and preserving types of plants, a refuge for wildlife and information about plants for the public.

Traffic islands, street gardens and motorway embankments

This traffic island provides boundaries, good visibility and has low maintenance requirements.
This traffic island provides boundaries, good visibility and has low maintenance requirements.
The embankment plantings in front of Te Kura in Wellington.
The embankment plantings in front of Te Kura in Wellington.

Plants on a traffic island and on a motorway embankment help beautify these places, and also define boundaries. Plants in traffic islands make the island more visible.

Cemeteries

These are beautified to provide peace and tranquillity for those who visit them. They usually have walkways and seating. Some cemeteries have small gardens around each plot.

Large buildings and shopping centres

Trees around public buildings soften the effect of the hard grey building materials and can provide pleasant areas for people to sit outside to eat, rest or talk.

Local reserves and regional parks

On Kapiti Island, New Zealand native bush is regenerating.
On Kapiti Island, New Zealand native bush is regenerating.  Plants that are not New Zealand natives have been removed. Walking tracks have been built to allow people to view the bird and plant life of this offshore island without damaging seedling growth.

Many local reserves and regional parks are situated around natural features such as:

  • wetlands
  • beach reserves
  • forests
  • rivers
  • lakes.

Much of the area is preserved in its natural state, with designated areas for recreational uses like:

  • walking tracks
  • swimming
  • picnics, barbeques and camping
  • fishing and hunting.

Any additional planting usually uses New Zealand native plants which match the existing vegetation.

National parks

National parks are like regional parks on a larger scale. They are set aside to preserve a particular New Zealand native habitat forever. Some areas of national parks have limited access; others are open to the general public and usually provide walking tracks, tramping huts, camping sites, toilets and information.

Rural landscapes

Mixed plantings in farm shelter belts give visual interest for people and give animals summer shade and protection from cold winter winds.
Mixed plantings in farm shelter belts give visual interest for people and give animals summer shade and protection from cold winter winds.

Trees are planted to give shelter to farm animals and crops from wind, snow and strong sunlight. The careful planting of trees and placement of buildings can make the landscape pleasing to look at, and still be economical and practical.

Planting can blend a house into its natural surroundings and provide shelter. The best effect is achieved if a variety of plants are used and they follow the natural landscape pattern, rather than fence lines and legal boundaries.

Complete Activity 6A in your workbook

Key points   Key point

  • Many areas other than the home garden are landscaped to make them more attractive and for easier access.

What's next?

Go to: 7 Design tools.

Hard landscaping Design tools